Today’s Read: Melody Mercado’s Piece on Sweet Tooth Farm

Monika is everyone’s favorite person including mine. So, it’s shitty when the city decides to fuck with her livelihood. My favorite Register reporter, Melody Mercado, details that shittiness the city is putting Monika, Sweet Tooth Farm and Radiate DSM through all in the name of money. Because feeding hungry people isn’t important. As someone who faced a lot of resistance to feed hungry college students, I cannot stand when people get in the way of food security. One of the easiest ways to maintain systemic discrimination is to keep the marginalized hungry. In other words, fuck the systems. We cannot fight for our wholeness if we can’t even keep people fed. (Sadly, that’s the whole plan by these assholes, isn’t it?)

Additional relevant links:

Sweet Tooth Farm

Her IG

Radiate DSM

Rooted Farm Collective

Heart of Des Moines Farmer’s Market

Tackling Taboo Talk

Alliterations aside (heh), part of why Whole Damn Woman exists is because I grew tired of being told things weren’t polite to discuss. I remember in the early days of my Instagram use, I shared I wanted to talk about bodies and sex and food and politics and sexuality and race . . . a friend replied, “You mean all the stuff that’s not polite to bring up over dinner?”

Yes, that’s exactly what I mean.

Think about it. We live in a constant relationship with our bodies, but we rarely talk about them. During a presentation this morning, I asked attendees if they were ever asked as kids, “How do you feel about your body today?” Or even “How are you feeling in your body today?” No one said yes.

Yet we’re also told, “Listen to your body.” Like how? No one teaches us that. But we can’t bring it up because talking about bodies is impolite.

The same goes for politics, which influences and affects literally everything we do. Yet it’s rude to talk about it because it’s supposedly divisive.

Sex? Literally how we are created.

Food? Literally how we stay alive.

Sexuality? Literally how we maneuver major relationships.

Race? Literally a part of how we encounter one another.

Yet we aren’t supposed to talk about these things? This is my problem. Calling such major topics “impolite” forces us into silence, which perpetuates hatred, violence, abuse, and ignorance. If we can’t talk about what massively affects us, how are we to tackle the problems?

Maybe calling it all “impolite” was by design . . .

UPDATES: DSM Food Database, 5/7/21

Some quick thoughts:

  • Black Cat Ice Cream is going where Woody’s Smoke Shack was. That’s a sad sign for any potential return of Woody’s/Stew’s after Stew’s passing. We were holding out hope.
  • I’m pretty sure Tacos mi Carmelo is closed. We passed it, and it looked deserted. I’ll have to double check though.
  • I can’t find anything about Wol’s beyond filing for a liquor license.
  • TH Cheesecakes is in Waukee, but I can’t tell if they have a location or operate inside another place. I’ll be checking that out, and I’ll update when I find out.
  • Are picnics the new food trend? It’s a pandemic-friendly way to eat. Might as well be. I think we’re beyond the charcuterie boom.
  • As always, if you know of any changes for food businesses in the area, please let me know!

Weekly Wholeness Update: Self-Care Forever

Wholeness through Relaxation

I’m getting my first massage since December 2019 (everything on me hurts), and I’m giving Inner Space’s Salt Lounge a try for the first time in the hopes that it clears out my tree-pollen soaked sinuses. Beyond that, I’m indulging in my hobbies: Cubs baseball (nine-game stretch!), virtually attending a gender equity and finance conference, and trying new-to-me foods.

While the conference will get me riled up and experiencing new things will make me scurred, I’ll be feeding my wholeness by making sure I indulge in humanity. I hope you’re joining me in this! Tell me about your self-care plans this week!

Wholeness through Goals

As mentioned in a series of Instagram stories on Monday (I’m thinking about moving all IG stories here once they expire, but I digress), Hubster and I post-vaccination vacationed in downtown Chicago over the weekend, and my soul sang an entire damn musical about rejuvenation, and not the kind the beauty industry tries to sell. I mean real, spiritual, world-connectedness, humanity-nourishing rejuvenation. I often say the end of Navy Pier is my soul-reset spot, but Navy Pier is still closed, so we didn’t get there. Turns out, maybe it’s just anywhere with above floor fifteen along Lake Shore Drive.

The view from our hotel floor. I can see the end of Navy Pier. Maybe that was enough?

I love Des Moines, and I’m weirdly defensive about Iowa, but after this trip, it hit me how much I hate this state. I tried. I really tried to love it here. After living in Kansas and coming back, I did love it here for several years because I knew how shitty it could be elsewhere.

But I need to be in a place where tobacco-chewing White dudes in beat-up White pickups aren’t coal-rolling people for having Bernie stickers. I need a lot less Trump nonsense in my life, and a lot more “I ain’t got time for your shit, but in a friendly way” people who get out of your way, let you do your thing, and don’t try to control what bathroom you use. You know. Chicagoans.

Sadly, we can’t move out of state for some time. Our parents are aging, and both moms have had major health issues this year. We stay for them.

If we’re going to stay, I decided I need to remember what makes me vibrate on my favorite frequency. So, I set (or really reset) new goals:

  1. Seek out new experiences in DSM
  2. Improve my physical health
  3. Revamp my finances

Later this week, I’ll expand on these and what they mean for Whole Damn Woman and maybe for you!

Wholeness through Community a.k.a. All the Fucking Food

Y’all! I have SO MANY FOOD DATABASE UPDATES for this week. I have at least 40. Shit’s getting real! I’ll have those probably tomorrow, but I also planned a full database update tomorrow, so it’s gonna take me all damn day. Still. It’s worth it. Knowing what new stuff we have helps me with connecting with the community.

I’m excited to see what all you plan to try this summer. Though, I do caution you. I’m still not dining in. This is all food trucks, take out, delivery, and *maybe* patios. Do local restaurants a favor and be kind to them. Staffing is super low, diners are super assholey, and serving minimum wage is still only $4.35.

Beyond that, I’m finally delving into local food trucks, specifically taco trucks. Because taco trucks were so heavily stigmatized during my childhood (I was taught they were drug dealers . . . not racist at all), I’ve long avoided them. This year, fuck that. I’m gonna try all the things! This week, I’m trying Tacos Degollado (Tacos slain? Tacos beheaded? Tacos that slay? What even does that mean?).

I’m also picking up some yums from Bread by Chelsa B this week. Long live the home baker!

Tell me what you’re eating this week! I wanna know what you’re doing to stay connected to your community.

4/17/21: DSM Food Database Updates!

Last week, I had no updates for the DSM Food Database, but this week . . . whoa! I did some digging on Facebook, and I found a bunch of stuff I didn’t know existed. Several new places came across from my friends and family as well. So, here you are. HUGE updates in the graphic below!

Two notes though: Steve McFadden owns Tipsy Crow Tavern, Sambetti’s, Grumpy Goat, and several other places in the area. If you don’t know, he’s not our peeps. Well, he also owns 50th Street Tap, which is now Boomer’s Bicycle Lounge, which means I won’t be trying TäKō.

But the sad part for me is I learned his wife, Trisha, owns Early Bird Brunch, which is opening in West Des Moines. I was looking forward to that one because we have such a shortage of breakfast and brunch places here, but so much for that.

It would help if The Breakfast Club that just opened wasn’t owned by the Gusto Pizza/El Guapo dudes because I don’t like them either. Could we please get a Black-woman owned breakfast place in this fucking city?! OH WAIT. I forgot we live in hell now.

And if you’re the odd racist dickwad hate-reading this, you’re welcome. Lots of places for you to spend your money. Enjoy eating with people who all shit in the the same gene pool. Makes you wonder how many times they coughed on your food. Oh! I guess it would’ve helped if y’all were pro-mask, huh?

12/9: Resource of the Day (RoD): Pho King 2020

Pho King 2020 is happening. Between the fantastic name and the fact that pho is beloved, I wanted to make sure everyone knew this existed. In addition to merch, you get discounts on several restaurants that serve pho. Most of the discounts go through December 31st, but that’s only three weeks away, and with the holidays, availability may be even more limited. So, please support local, support marginalized communities, and get cheaper pho.

(Secret: I’ve not had pho yet. I’m waiting for it to get ass cold outside.)

Social Justice Review: Hy-Vee

(The opinions expressed here are solely mine and do not reflect upon anyone I know. In other words, Hy-Vee, please don’t fire anyone I know who works at Hy-Vee. They had nothing to do with this. Also, this is a rough draft.)

For those who don’t know, Hy-Vee is a grocery store chain that opened in small town Iowa 90 years ago and has now expanded to eight states. If you’re from Iowa and older than 30, you likely grew up shopping at either Hy-Vee or Dahl’s (RIP) or both when the deals were good. Hy-Vee is part of Iowa’s identity (we know the jingle), and Iowans are fiercely loyal. This loyalty, however, can become blind, and it’s time to evaluate Hy-Vee’s role in social responsibility and equity.

Let’s start with the hopeful because who doesn’t need hope right now?

Hy-Vee puts a lot of money back into the community. They created, head, and contribute to multiple programs to hire veterans, address food insecurity, practice sustainability, provide millions of dollars in scholarships, and fight the pandemic. They provide over 80,000 jobs to the Midwest, and they are–as they like to remind us often–employee owned. Why wouldn’t they want to remind us? That’s a thing of pride. Even the current CEO is an example of the Hy-Vee success story. This company has all the trappings of a truly Iowa Nice corporation.

So, how about their role in social justice?

Well, Hy-Vee stepped up this summer to honor Juneteenth. Ultimately, Hy-Vee donated one million dollars to several Black organizations including Urban Dreams, a local social justice organization. Hy-Vee also has a long history of hiring individuals with disabilities. Personally, this is one area where I applaud Hy-Vee. On the surface at least, they appear inclusive and mindful of mobility assistance. (Am I linking you to death? Hey, I just want to prove this isn’t random ranting.) I also saw an article addressing Hy-Vee’s assistance to disabled truck drivers.

Personally, I shopped at Hy-Vee for most of my life. If I wasn’t shopping at Dahl’s, I was probably at Hy-Vee. I know a ton of people who either worked or still work for Hy-Vee. It’s important to be fair here. Hy-Vee does contribute to the community, to the Iowa economy, and to our culture. They provide important, essential services, and I’m barely scratching the surface.

You know what’s coming, right? If you’d like to remain ignorant about Hy-Vee, stop reading now.

Sure, Hy-Vee shows up, and like most corporations, they do so with flaws. Some corporations have unintentional flaws. Sometimes, those biases, ignorances, and prejudices embedded in American culture reveal themselves as Hy-Vee along with the rest of us learn to do better.

The observations I’m about to discuss aren’t criticisms of those all-too-human flaws. Instead, they are observations about intentional decisions and actions Hy-Vee has made, which harm others and the community. It is these conscious efforts that harm their attempts at social injustice.

Regarding racial inequity and injustice, Hy-Vee got itself into a lot of trouble with several members of the Black community this summer. Iowa Capital Dispatch detailed the experiences of one former employee and how her decisions to speak up, attend Black Lives Matter protests, and express her concerns about Hy-Vee’s COVID-19 response resulted in management confronting the employee. In the end, she quit her job there. The on-going protests this summer targeted the employee’s former store in what has now become a point of contention between the community, Black Lives Matter leaders, the Des Moines Police, and Hy-Vee.

Hy-Vee’s response was not to support the employee or defend her. It was to defend itself. Shortly after this incident, Hy-Vee put massive black banners on all of its stores stating how much money they’d donated to racial equality efforts. While I can only speak for myself, this move came across as defensive. In fact, Hy-Vee’s donations to racial justice organizations came on the day George Floyd was buried. Hy-Vee’s commitment to racial equity was, at best, reactionary. I have seen little from Hy-Vee in the way of support for Black Americans or any other underrepresented since the protest at their store.

To be fair, most of America’s reaction to racial injustice is reactionary, so let’s move on.

Notice I’ve not mentioned Hy-Vee’s commitment to the rights of LGBTQ+ Americans. (I’ve also not mentioned several other underrepresented groups, so I recognize the irony, and I apologize.) That’s because, based upon quick research, there isn’t any. If you Google “Hy-Vee” and “LGBT,” the results are damning. Hy-Vee has a history of allowing bigoted organizations to fundraise at storefronts and donating to homophobic political candidates. I also know Hy-Vee has been unkind to LGBT+ leaders and organizations (don’t ask).

It’s this last point that’s the biggest problem for Hy-Vee.

Per Forbes, Hy-Vee is a $10 billion a year corporation. They don’t make that kind of money without getting involved in politics because, as all businesses know, political policy affects their bottom line. Now, Hy-Vee did not directly donate to any political candidate or party. Instead, the Hy-Vee Employee’s Political Action Committee (PAC) donated. I want to make that clear because people will say, “Oh, Hy-Vee donated to Trump.” Corporations cannot directly donate to a candidate or campaign. It must go through their PAC. Moreover, Hy-Vee’s employees, corporate officers, and board donated individually to campaigns. Those distinctions are important because that allows Hy-Vee to deny that they’ve endorsed any candidate. It allows them to say things like this:

“It’s imperative that a business of our size constantly be talking about economic outcomes on a local, state and national level on a continual basis. That’s just good business. As one of the few 90-year-old companies in the Midwest, we must constantly be looking at outcomes that may impact our business model and opportunities for employment. The year doesn’t matter, but the policy does — and certain policies can have detrimental effects on the retail sector if not closely monitored and reviewed.”

https://iowacapitaldispatch.com/2020/10/24/hy-vee-ceos-political-message-to-employees-cites-tax-concerns-social-unrest/

Hy-Vee’s spokesperson stated this in response to what I consider the biggest problem with Hy-Vee: Their not-so-subtle support of the Trump administration. Of the money Hy-Vee Employee’s PAC donated to political candidates, an overwhelming amount has funded Republicans since 2012. In fairness, some money has gone to Democrats, but the split is drastic. Hy-Vee Employee’s PAC donated over $1.5 million since 2012, and only a few thousand has gone to Democrats. The issue isn’t that Hy-Vee Employee’s PAC or individual employees are wrong for doing so. They aren’t. It’s their right to donate. It’s that Hy-Vee isn’t trying very hard to care about social justice. Basically, their efforts are performative. I remind you that the $1 million they donated to racial justice causes occurred only after George Floyd’s murder gripped America’s headlines, and it is less than they’ve donated to political candidates and causes over eight years. And one million dollars is not even one percent of Hy-Vee’s revenue.

That quotation came from the same piece in which the Iowa Capital Dispatch shared the words of CEO Randy Edeker:

“I never endorse and I try not to ever push a certain candidate or a direction. I always try to speak about Hy-Vee. I have some of the concerns about some of the policies that are being discussed by some of the candidates. Some of the tax policies would be very impactful to Hy-Vee. And the changes in taxes were part of the way we were able to bring a lot of good things to the employees this past year. Social unrest unfortunately continues to be a problem around the community and we continue to invest in our local groups who we really think can bring unity to our towns.”

https://iowacapitaldispatch.com/2020/10/24/hy-vee-ceos-political-message-to-employees-cites-tax-concerns-social-unrest/

The Capital Dispatch breaks this down nicely, and I want to echo their observations. It is the use of the phrase “social unrest” that concerns me. Edeker isn’t concerned with racism. He’s not thinking about Black Iowans demanding police brutality stop. He wants the protests to stop being a “problem.”

Furthermore, he mentions how the current tax situation was favorable to Hy-Vee. As Republicans are in power at nearly every level and in nearly every state in which Hy-Vee operates, Edeker’s attempts to be subtle with his message failed.

But this is not a surprise to anyone who has been paying attention to Hy-Vee’s “we don’t know her” attempts at covering their support of Trump, their favoritism toward the Trump Administration (scroll to the bottom and get a glimpse of how anti-LGBT+ is by putting the poster boy of homophobia in front of their logo and their super-gross hashtag), and their gooey relationships with Trump-loving Republicans. (How that last bit of information in the last link is legal, I do not know.)

The most disturbing part of all this is Hy-Vee’s minimal action regarding COVID-19. Health justice is social justice, and Hy-Vee seems not only unconcerned but gleeful about this pandemic. Initially, Hy-Vee did not require employees to wear masks. It took them six weeks to implement the policy. We can forgive them for that. The CDC wasn’t clear on if masks were helpful. But even then, Hy-Vee did not provide employees masks.

Hy-Vee did make a number of changes, and I do applaud them for that. However, they’ve never required customers to wear masks in store. And then this from the Capital Dispatch (Oh, just go read it):

“In an email, Hy-Vee spokesperson Tina Potthoff stated, ‘Due to COVID-19, many supermarkets have set records this year with so many consumers opting to eat at home versus eat out. Hy-Vee had more than $11 billion in sales in FY 2020 compared to slightly more than $10.6 billion in sales in FY 2019.'”

https://iowacapitaldispatch.com/2020/10/24/hy-vee-ceos-political-message-to-employees-cites-tax-concerns-social-unrest/

While Potthoff is merely stating a fact, there’s something disturbing about opting to state this fact this way. There’s no getting around the reality that their spokesperson credited a lethal pandemic for their increased profits. And it’s not a small profit. I’m sure a bunch of small businesses are also seeing increases in profits due to the pandemic. It’s that we’re talking in billions.

Did their spokesperson not think how this might come across?

Obviously not, because there was more:

“Hy-Vee’s Aisles Online business quadrupled due to fears of the deadly virus, Potthoff said.”

https://iowacapitaldispatch.com/2020/10/24/hy-vee-ceos-political-message-to-employees-cites-tax-concerns-social-unrest/

My brain cannot comprehend the callousness of stating profit in this way. A portion of Hy-Vee’s “business quadrupled” because of fear of death and suffering. I suppose nothing could be more American than that.

Truth is: I have so many issues with Hy-Vee’s Band-Aid approach to social justice that–earlier this year–my husband and I stopped shopping there. I have only two prescriptions running through their pharmacy that I’m working to get switched, but we will have walked away from Hy-Vee entirely soon. I haven’t even gotten into questions about their environmental blunders, their just-above-the-poverty-line pay, and their encouragement of diet culture.

It’s not that any grocery store in the area is perfect regarding social justice. The complaint is more that Hy-Vee’s efforts are overridden by their commitment to politics and practices that create and contribute to social injustice. Frankly, they have the money, the skilled-workforce, and the knowledge to do better. They just don’t.